In this photograph is His Majesty, King Ogbidi Okojie - 14th Onojie of Uromi - with his wives. He married over 600 wives and had over 400 concubines. He was the most powerful monarch in Southern Nigeria after the fall of Ovonramwen until his own travails began.

Ogbidi is remembered for his resistance to British imperialism and his strong alliance with the Oba Ovonramwen of Benin. He was first exiled to Calabar in 1900 when Uromi was invaded by the British troops. Unlike Chief Nana of Brohimie-Warri, who opposed a strong resistance to the British troops when his domain was invaded, with 100 cannon, several shot-guns and over 5,000 slaves at his disposal, Okojie I, who had no modern weapons, but only Dane guns, bows and arrows, held out against the Brits for six months, until he was betrayed by Iyahanebi, his "younger brother”, and had to surrender to the British. As a consequence of his stiff resistance, in 1900 he was exiled to Calabar, where he met Oba Ovonramwen, late Oba of Benin, who had been exiled there by the British. He survived the ordeal in detention and returned home to be crowned the 14th Onojie of Uromi in 1909.

Back home in Uromi, he adapted to the British system of government through "indirect rule", establishing his court at Ubiaja. Still, he did not fully accept the new system of government, countering it with passive disobedience and maintaining his opposition to British rule. He kept governing his subjects as his forebears had always done, until he was deported again, this time to Benin, in 1917. His presence in Benin unsettled Oba Eweka II, the then ruling Oba, who objected to the British Resident at Benin against the powerful Ogbidi Okojie's presence in Benin. In 1924, he was transferred to Ibadan. In 1926, he made a dramatic escape to Uromi. He was arrested and taken back to Ibadan, until he was finally released in 1931. From 1931 until his death in 1944 he consolidated his power in Uromi. His first son Prince Uagbale Okojie was crowned Onojie of Uromi in 1944.

While alive, he was highly influential in Esanland Agbor and Benin. In Esanland he was the supreme judge of the colonial criminal court that sat and tried murder cases at Agbede, Esanland and Ologhodo (now Agbor). He built schools and supported higher learning . He built the roads from Uromi to IIIushi, Agbor and Ehor. When he died, he left behind an undisputed heir to the throne, glorious memories of life in exile and the fulfillment of his aspiration for renewed independence for black Africa and Nigeria.He inspired nationalism among his people and especially his children and grand children.

Thus, Chief Anthony Enahoro, one of his grandchildren, would in 1953, initiate the Motion for self-government in the Western House of Assembly, which eventually led to Nigeria's Independence on the 1st day of October, 1960. A younger grandson is Peter Enahoro, revered pan-African journalist and author of How to be a Nigerian (1966). Another is anthony Cardinal Okogie, the first Catholic Church's Cardinal from Edo State and Dr. Robert Okojie, a NASA scientist based in the U.S.

His Majesty, Ogbidi Okojie I, the Onojie of Uromi, was survived by over sixty wives, over forty concubines, and innumerable children and grandchildren. He is still remembered by his people as "Ogbidi the Umbrella of Uromi'', ''the white son of Olokun'', ''Okun the greatest native doctor that ever lived and ruled the native people of Uromi'', ''He who can turn into a girl, a lion or a leopard at will'', ''the great doctor who can command the rain to fall and the air to stand still", among other appellations — with Greg Ekhator and 11 others.


In this photograph is His Majesty, King Ogbidi Okojie - 14th Onojie of Uromi - with his wives. He married over 600 wives and had over 400 concubines. He was the most powerful monarch in Southern Nigeria after the fall of Ovonramwen until his own travails began. Ogbidi is remembered for his resistance to British imperialism and his strong alliance with the Oba Ovonramwen of Benin. He was first exiled to Calabar in 1900 when Uromi was invaded by the British troops. Unlike Chief Nana of Brohimie-Warri, who opposed a strong resistance to the British troops when his domain was invaded, with 100 cannon, several shot-guns and over 5,000 slaves at his disposal, Okojie I, who had no modern weapons, but only Dane guns, bows and arrows, held out against the Brits for six months, until he was betrayed by Iyahanebi, his "younger brother”, and had to surrender to the British. As a consequence of his stiff resistance, in 1900 he was exiled to Calabar, where he met Oba Ovonramwen, late Oba of Benin, who had been exiled there by the British. He survived the ordeal in detention and returned home to be crowned the 14th Onojie of Uromi in 1909. Back home in Uromi, he adapted to the British system of government through "indirect rule", establishing his court at Ubiaja. Still, he did not fully accept the new system of government, countering it with passive disobedience and maintaining his opposition to British rule. He kept governing his subjects as his forebears had always done, until he was deported again, this time to Benin, in 1917. His presence in Benin unsettled Oba Eweka II, the then ruling Oba, who objected to the British Resident at Benin against the powerful Ogbidi Okojie's presence in Benin. In 1924, he was transferred to Ibadan. In 1926, he made a dramatic escape to Uromi. He was arrested and taken back to Ibadan, until he was finally released in 1931. From 1931 until his death in 1944 he consolidated his power in Uromi. His first son Prince Uagbale Okojie was crowned Onojie of Uromi in 1944. While alive, he was highly influential in Esanland Agbor and Benin. In Esanland he was the supreme judge of the colonial criminal court that sat and tried murder cases at Agbede, Esanland and Ologhodo (now Agbor). He built schools and supported higher learning . He built the roads from Uromi to IIIushi, Agbor and Ehor. When he died, he left behind an undisputed heir to the throne, glorious memories of life in exile and the fulfillment of his aspiration for renewed independence for black Africa and Nigeria.He inspired nationalism among his people and especially his children and grand children. Thus, Chief Anthony Enahoro, one of his grandchildren, would in 1953, initiate the Motion for self-government in the Western House of Assembly, which eventually led to Nigeria's Independence on the 1st day of October, 1960. A younger grandson is Peter Enahoro, revered pan-African journalist and author of How to be a Nigerian (1966). Another is anthony Cardinal Okogie, the first Catholic Church's Cardinal from Edo State and Dr. Robert Okojie, a NASA scientist based in the U.S. His Majesty, Ogbidi Okojie I, the Onojie of Uromi, was survived by over sixty wives, over forty concubines, and innumerable children and grandchildren. He is still remembered by his people as "Ogbidi the Umbrella of Uromi'', ''the white son of Olokun'', ''Okun the greatest native doctor that ever lived and ruled the native people of Uromi'', ''He who can turn into a girl, a lion or a leopard at will'', ''the great doctor who can command the rain to fall and the air to stand still", among other appellations

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