Zimbabwe crisis: Army takes over - Mugabe 'detained'
34 minutes ago


Media captionMaj Gen Sibusiso Moyo read out a statement on national TV early on Wednesday
The military has seized control in Zimbabwe but has said President Robert Mugabe, in power since 1980, is safe.
After seizing state TV, an army spokesman announced it was targeting people close to Mr Mugabe who had caused "social and economic suffering".
The move came after Mr Mugabe sacked his deputy, Emmerson Mnangagwa, in favour of his wife, Grace.
Heavy gun and artillery fire could be heard in northern parts of the capital Harare early on Wednesday.
A statement read out by a general on air denied it was a coup and said Mr Mugabe was safe but did not say where.

Latest reaction and updates
What we know so far
The rise of Grace Mugabe
There was no immediate word from Mr Mugabe himself.
Mr Mugabe, 93, has dominated the impoverished country's political scene since independence from the UK.

The UK Foreign Office advised Britons "currently in Harare to remain safely at home or in their accommodation until the situation becomes clearer", while the US embassy in Harare advised US citizens in Zimbabwe to "shelter in place" until further notice.
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How did the military justify its move?
Soldiers overran the headquarters of the ZBC broadcaster after armoured vehicles took up position on roads around Harare on Tuesday.
Maj Gen Sibusiso Moyo went on air to say the military wished to "assure the nation that his Excellency the president... and his family are safe and sound and their security is guaranteed".

Soldiers patrolled Harare on Wednesday
"We are only targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes... that are causing social and economic suffering in the country," he said.
"As soon as we have accomplished our mission, we expect that the situation will return to normalcy."
Other key points of the statement included:
Citizens should remain calm and limit unnecessary movement
The military assures the Zimbabwean judiciary that its independence is guaranteed
Security services should "co-operate for the good of our country" and any provocation would "be met with an appropriate response"
All leave for the defence forces is cancelled and personnel should return to barracks immediately
It is not clear who is leading the military action. Army chief Gen Constantino Chiwenga had said the army was prepared to act to end purges within the ruling Zanu-PF party.
Who else has been detained?
A government source told Reuters news agency that Finance Minister Ignatius Chombo had been detained.
He is a leading member of a faction of Zanu-PF led by Mr Mugabe's wife Grace.
Is this a coup?
Alex Magaisa, former adviser to Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai, told the BBC he did not believe the military's claim that they had not carried out a coup.

General Chiwenga had warned of a military takeover
"They have decided not to call it a coup because they know that a coup does not sell, it will be condemned," he said.
"But as far as authority is concerned it seems very clear that President Mugabe is now just a president in name and authority is now residing in the military."
Zanu-PF had accused Gen Chiwenga of "treasonable conduct" after he issued his warning that he army might intervene.


What do we know of the fighting?


The firing was coming from northern suburbs where Mr Mugabe and a number of government officials live, the BBC's Shingai Nyoka reports from Harare.
A witness told AFP news agency it could be heard near Mr Mugabe's residence in the suburb of Borrowdale early on Wednesday,
Some staff at ZBC were manhandled when the soldiers moved in, sources told Reuters. Workers were told that they "should not worry", a source added, and that soldiers were only there to protect the site.
What was the political situation before the army acted?
Mr Mugabe sacked Mr Mnangagwa last week, amid a row over succession.
Mr Mnangagwa had previously been seen as an heir to the president, but First Lady Grace Mugabe had since become the clear front-runner.

Grace Mugabe is seen as a potential successor to her elderly husband
The rivalry between Mrs Mugabe and Mr Mnangagwa has split Zanu-PF.
Last month, Mrs Mugabe had warned of a possible coup plot, saying allies of Mr Mnangagwa were threatening the lives of those who didn't support him.
Zanu-PF said Gen Chiwenga's comments were "calculated to disturb national peace... [and] incite insurrection".
The party said it would never succumb to military threats, and that it "reaffirms the primacy of politics over the gun".
Gen Chiwenga had said the "purging" within Zanu-PF was "clearly targeting members of the party with a liberation background", referring to the country's struggle for freedom from white minority rule.
Mr Mnangagwa is one such veteran of the 1970s war which ended white minority rule.

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From Rhodesia to Zimbabwe –
April 18, 1980: Rhodesia gains independence after 90 years as a British colony, taking new name Zimbabwe. The 1972-1979 war of independence between nationalist blacks and the minority white regime led by Ian Smith has left 27,000 dead.

Robert Mugabe, head of the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU), takes power as prime minister. Joshua Nkomo, head of the Zimbabwe African Peoples Union (ZAPU), Mugabe’s partner in the armed struggle, becomes interior minister.

February 17, 1982: Nkomo, accused of plotting a coup, is dismissed. Armed resistance in his stronghold of Matabeleland is met with bloody government repression. At least 20,000 die.

December 30, 1987: Mugabe becomes head of state after reforming the constitution to usher in a presidential regime. Two years later rival movements merge to become the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF).

– White farms seized –
February 2000: Start of a violent campaign of seizure of white farms by squatters and pro-Mugabe war veterans.

More than 4,000 of the 4,500 white farmers are stripped of their land, with the support of the regime, with the official goal of correcting inequalities dating back to the colonial era.

– Mugabe hangs on –
March 2002: Mugabe is re-elected president in a poll marred by violence and widely denounced as rigged. Western sanctions are imposed.

March 2008: ZANU-PF is defeated by tMorgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) in parliamentary polls. Tsvangirai wins the first-round presidential vote, but withdraws from the second round, citing violence against his supporters. Mugabe is inaugurated for a new term.

August 2013: Mugabe is declared re-elected in July 31 elections with 61 percent of the vote, against Tsvangirai’s 34 percent.

Tsvangirai describes the election as a “huge farce” and “null and void”.

The EU, however, starts normalising relations with Zimbabwe, lifting most of its sanctions.

– Purge –
December 6, 2014: Mugabe names his 49-year-old wife Grace as head of the ruling ZANU-PF party’s women’s wing.

He then seeks to quell infighting over his successor by purging his foes.

April 14, 2016: MDC gathers more than 2,000 demonstrators in Harare in the biggest march organised for a decade against Mugabe.

September 24, 2017: Activist pastor Evan Mawarire is arrested after he posts a video bemoaning the country’s worsening economic troubles.

November 6: Mugabe fires Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa, long considered his probable successor, who has close ties to the military and the powerful independence war veterans. He flees the country.

November 13: Army chief General Constantino Chiwenga demands a “stop” to purges and warns the military could intervene.

November 14: Several tanks are seen by witnesses moving near Harare.

November 15: Military announces that Mugabe “and his family are safe and sound.” Declares it is only “targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes” and insists this is not a military takeover. Military vehicles block the road outside parliament and are deployed near ZANU-PF offices.

AFPFrom Rhodesia to Zimbabwe –
April 18, 1980: Rhodesia gains independence after 90 years as a British colony, taking new name Zimbabwe. The 1972-1979 war of independence between nationalist blacks and the minority white regime led by Ian Smith has left 27,000 dead.

Robert Mugabe, head of the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU), takes power as prime minister. Joshua Nkomo, head of the Zimbabwe African Peoples Union (ZAPU), Mugabe’s partner in the armed struggle, becomes interior minister.

February 17, 1982: Nkomo, accused of plotting a coup, is dismissed. Armed resistance in his stronghold of Matabeleland is met with bloody government repression. At least 20,000 die.

December 30, 1987: Mugabe becomes head of state after reforming the constitution to usher in a presidential regime. Two years later rival movements merge to become the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF).

– White farms seized –
February 2000: Start of a violent campaign of seizure of white farms by squatters and pro-Mugabe war veterans.

More than 4,000 of the 4,500 white farmers are stripped of their land, with the support of the regime, with the official goal of correcting inequalities dating back to the colonial era.

– Mugabe hangs on –
March 2002: Mugabe is re-elected president in a poll marred by violence and widely denounced as rigged. Western sanctions are imposed.

March 2008: ZANU-PF is defeated by tMorgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) in parliamentary polls. Tsvangirai wins the first-round presidential vote, but withdraws from the second round, citing violence against his supporters. Mugabe is inaugurated for a new term.

August 2013: Mugabe is declared re-elected in July 31 elections with 61 percent of the vote, against Tsvangirai’s 34 percent.

Tsvangirai describes the election as a “huge farce” and “null and void”.

The EU, however, starts normalising relations with Zimbabwe, lifting most of its sanctions.

– Purge –
December 6, 2014: Mugabe names his 49-year-old wife Grace as head of the ruling ZANU-PF party’s women’s wing.

He then seeks to quell infighting over his successor by purging his foes.

April 14, 2016: MDC gathers more than 2,000 demonstrators in Harare in the biggest march organised for a decade against Mugabe.

September 24, 2017: Activist pastor Evan Mawarire is arrested after he posts a video bemoaning the country’s worsening economic troubles.

November 6: Mugabe fires Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa, long considered his probable successor, who has close ties to the military and the powerful independence war veterans. He flees the country.

November 13: Army chief General Constantino Chiwenga demands a “stop” to purges and warns the military could intervene.

November 14: Several tanks are seen by witnesses moving near Harare.

November 15: Military announces that Mugabe “and his family are safe and sound.” Declares it is only “targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes” and insists this is not a military takeover. Military vehicles block the road outside parliament and are deployed near ZANU-PF offices.

AFPFrom Rhodesia to Zimbabwe –
April 18, 1980: Rhodesia gains independence after 90 years as a British colony, taking new name Zimbabwe. The 1972-1979 war of independence between nationalist blacks and the minority white regime led by Ian Smith has left 27,000 dead.

Robert Mugabe, head of the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU), takes power as prime minister. Joshua Nkomo, head of the Zimbabwe African Peoples Union (ZAPU), Mugabe’s partner in the armed struggle, becomes interior minister.

February 17, 1982: Nkomo, accused of plotting a coup, is dismissed. Armed resistance in his stronghold of Matabeleland is met with bloody government repression. At least 20,000 die.

December 30, 1987: Mugabe becomes head of state after reforming the constitution to usher in a presidential regime. Two years later rival movements merge to become the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF).

– White farms seized –
February 2000: Start of a violent campaign of seizure of white farms by squatters and pro-Mugabe war veterans.

More than 4,000 of the 4,500 white farmers are stripped of their land, with the support of the regime, with the official goal of correcting inequalities dating back to the colonial era.

– Mugabe hangs on –
March 2002: Mugabe is re-elected president in a poll marred by violence and widely denounced as rigged. Western sanctions are imposed.

March 2008: ZANU-PF is defeated by tMorgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) in parliamentary polls. Tsvangirai wins the first-round presidential vote, but withdraws from the second round, citing violence against his supporters. Mugabe is inaugurated for a new term.

August 2013: Mugabe is declared re-elected in July 31 elections with 61 percent of the vote, against Tsvangirai’s 34 percent.

Tsvangirai describes the election as a “huge farce” and “null and void”.

The EU, however, starts normalising relations with Zimbabwe, lifting most of its sanctions.

– Purge –
December 6, 2014: Mugabe names his 49-year-old wife Grace as head of the ruling ZANU-PF party’s women’s wing.

He then seeks to quell infighting over his successor by purging his foes.

April 14, 2016: MDC gathers more than 2,000 demonstrators in Harare in the biggest march organised for a decade against Mugabe.

September 24, 2017: Activist pastor Evan Mawarire is arrested after he posts a video bemoaning the country’s worsening economic troubles.

November 6: Mugabe fires Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa, long considered his probable successor, who has close ties to the military and the powerful independence war veterans. He flees the country.

November 13: Army chief General Constantino Chiwenga demands a “stop” to purges and warns the military could intervene.

November 14: Several tanks are seen by witnesses moving near Harare.

November 15: Military announces that Mugabe “and his family are safe and sound.” Declares it is only “targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes” and insists this is not a military takeover. Military vehicles block the road outside parliament and are deployed near ZANU-PF offices.

AFPFrom Rhodesia to Zimbabwe –
April 18, 1980: Rhodesia gains independence after 90 years as a British colony, taking new name Zimbabwe. The 1972-1979 war of independence between nationalist blacks and the minority white regime led by Ian Smith has left 27,000 dead.

Robert Mugabe, head of the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU), takes power as prime minister. Joshua Nkomo, head of the Zimbabwe African Peoples Union (ZAPU), Mugabe’s partner in the armed struggle, becomes interior minister.

February 17, 1982: Nkomo, accused of plotting a coup, is dismissed. Armed resistance in his stronghold of Matabeleland is met with bloody government repression. At least 20,000 die.

December 30, 1987: Mugabe becomes head of state after reforming the constitution to usher in a presidential regime. Two years later rival movements merge to become the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF).

– White farms seized –
February 2000: Start of a violent campaign of seizure of white farms by squatters and pro-Mugabe war veterans.

More than 4,000 of the 4,500 white farmers are stripped of their land, with the support of the regime, with the official goal of correcting inequalities dating back to the colonial era.

– Mugabe hangs on –
March 2002: Mugabe is re-elected president in a poll marred by violence and widely denounced as rigged. Western sanctions are imposed.

March 2008: ZANU-PF is defeated by tMorgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) in parliamentary polls. Tsvangirai wins the first-round presidential vote, but withdraws from the second round, citing violence against his supporters. Mugabe is inaugurated for a new term.

August 2013: Mugabe is declared re-elected in July 31 elections with 61 percent of the vote, against Tsvangirai’s 34 percent.

Tsvangirai describes the election as a “huge farce” and “null and void”.

The EU, however, starts normalising relations with Zimbabwe, lifting most of its sanctions.

– Purge –
December 6, 2014: Mugabe names his 49-year-old wife Grace as head of the ruling ZANU-PF party’s women’s wing.

He then seeks to quell infighting over his successor by purging his foes.

April 14, 2016: MDC gathers more than 2,000 demonstrators in Harare in the biggest march organised for a decade against Mugabe.

September 24, 2017: Activist pastor Evan Mawarire is arrested after he posts a video bemoaning the country’s worsening economic troubles.

November 6: Mugabe fires Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa, long considered his probable successor, who has close ties to the military and the powerful independence war veterans. He flees the country.

November 13: Army chief General Constantino Chiwenga demands a “stop” to purges and warns the military could intervene.

November 14: Several tanks are seen by witnesses moving near Harare.

November 15: Military announces that Mugabe “and his family are safe and sound.” Declares it is only “targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes” and insists this is not a military takeover. Military vehicles block the road outside parliament and are deployed near ZANU-PF offices.

AFP

THE KISS OF THE MARRIED WOMAN THAT EVENTUALLY SCATTERED MUGABE'S KINGDOM.

Now, it's dfficult to piece together what is going to become of Zimbabwe after now, however history gives us a peek at the key actors in the drama currently playing out.

Now, this is the story you dont't know.

Mugabe the deposed President of Zimbabwe, Constantine Chiwenga the Head of the Zimbabwean Military and Mnangagwa the sacked Vice President of Zimbabwe are all friends, very good friends, they are comrades. The three men were in their 20's when they entered the bushes and took part in the liberation struggle to free Zimbabwe from white rule. Mugabe who was initially the Sect General of ZANU PF, became the head of state, the other two men were equally given plum positions of power and have continued as the 3 musketeers presiding over the destiny of Zimbabwe for 37 years.

Sometime in the 90's - Mugabe, the first musketeer fell in love with his personal secretary who happened to be another man's wife at the time, the lady's name was Grace and she became his mistress. While Mugabe was still married Grace had children for him. In 1996 they became man and wife after the death of Mugabe's first spouse.

But Grace was no ordinary mistress turned wife, she was not ready to take a backseat, she turned herself into Mugabe's political confidant, she used the bed and made her way to the very centre of Zimbabwean politics straining the relationship between Mugabe and his two comrades.

Mnangagwa the 2nd musketeer after many years of loyalty became Mugabe's Vice President in 2014, paving the way for his eventual hold on power should Mugabe retire, resign or die. But Grace had other ideas she wangled her way into ZANU PF's politburo and began her move to take out Mnangagwa and take power from her ailing husband.

In August 2017 Mnangagwa accused certain persons in the party of trying to poison him and made references to Grace. This didn't go down well with Mugabe, how could anyone accuse his beautiful harmless Rose flower. What Mugabe forgot was that boys are allowed to fight but the brotherhood must stay strong and united. In a move that shocked everyone (but didn't shock his beloved Grace) , he removed Mnangagwa from the position of Vice President, Mnangagwa not sure of what Grace will do to him fled to South Africa.

Now, in comes the 3rd musketeer Chiwenga Head of the Zimbabwaean military, a friend and brother of both Mugabe and Mnangagwa, "this is all the fault of one woman", he is probably thinking in his mind, " we were one until this woman came. I trust Mnangagwa to takeover, I don't know this woman; by the way, where was she when we were sleeping in the bushes before the liberation".

Chiwenga sends a warning to Mugabe advising him to put his house in order, the first time he has ever spoken this way to his senior comrade. Thinking Mugabe will take the signal, call him, negotiate and talk things over a cup of tea. NO! Mugabe does the exact opposite, he sends his Minister of Information to tell the Army General to stay out of State matters, Mugabe then finalises plans to sack Chiwenga. The military chief at this point knows his brother and comrade in arms has drunk deep from the strange woman's bosom, it's not him speaking anymore, so he rolls out his tanks early this morning. He's therefore right when he says,"this is not a coup" ; when you really look at it, 3 friends have only fallen out over the ambitions of a woman.

Latest reportś say Mnangagwa the 2nd Musketeer is on his way back from South Africa, i've just seen a report he's been installed interim President. The 1st Musketter Mugabe is under house arrest. The 3rd Musketter is in the saddle promising calm and quick elections. The 3 men have held Zimbabwe under lock and key for 37yrs, this is nothing but a change of baton. Zimbabwe needs a real revolution out of the hands of the veterans of the liberation struggle. In the 21st century Zimbabwe is the frozen out Animal Farm in George Orwells celebrated work.

Meanwhile the woman Grace, who started the whole katakata, I hear has fled the country leaving her beloved husband who sacrificed everything to face an uncertain fate.

16 million Zimbabweans could not remove Mugabe but a woman did.

Mama was always right when she always told me, "son - be careful who you fall in love with and eventually marry".

A lesson to all men.

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Great Benin Bronze

EDE N'ERHENA VBE EDO

"

These anti-Edo political organizations you folks went to join are the most anti-African - and Africans - in the world.

They're worse than anything; we obviously can't stop you though, even Ewuare II's manifest destiny lies in our own regional party.

We have egba Omo Oduduwa and so on, NPC, AG, the forerunner of them all NCNC and then now these cancers of today.

Stay "with them", but register for your most important election first: your local election, register Edo Political Front, and if you don't, vote the front.

No self respecting Edo will - in the future - find themselves the flag bearers and cheerleaders of foreign parties with indirect rule political and economic mandates, it just doesn't work.

No sane Edo person lives to "have the ear" of someone who doesn't have Edo at their heart.

The Supreme Court is the place to remove the frustration of these lethargic and "periodic" additions to the voting rolls; here - where I live - you can fill in the forms regarding changing your voter registration at the post office and other easy access places.

At the rate things are going we're going to find ourselves truly in decline as our populations suffer from simple things like protein deficiencies in children

" - Reggie Akpata

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